gutter cleaning GlasgowIts National Maintenance Week ~ November 23rd to 30th 2012

It’s a fact of life that no matter the construction, material or age of a building, if it is poorly maintained it cannot hold its value or be energy efficient – no matter what else you do to it.

In the current economic climate, when many homeowners are choosing to stay put, the importance of looking after the place where you live has never been more vital.

This year National Maintenance Week precedes the 2013 launch of the Government’s Green Deal drive to make buildings across the country more energy efficient.

The slightly controversial Green Deal, designed to help householders and businesses increase the energy efficiency of properties across the UK,  gives households and businesses undertaking energy efficiency property maintenance , and property improvements, up to £1,000 of discounts.

So what is it that makes a building energy efficient?

It seems that contrary to popular belief,  traditionally constructed properties – including walls of limestone, slate, granite and cob – actually loss less heat than expected- often perform better than commonly supposed.
[as reported in The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) research project]

However, no matter the construction, material or age of a building, if it is poorly maintained it cannot be energy efficient no matter what else you do to it.

Why is National Maintenance Week campaign so important?

The sad truth of the matter is that many people put property maintenance way down their list of priorities, especially during a tough economy.

The campaign is relevant to everyone who owns or cares for a property of any sort, whatever its age.  It ‘s aim is to promote awareness of the straightforward, economic and achievable maintenance steps that can be taken to stave off major and costly damage.

Keeping your property in good order makes good sense and saves money. Yes good maintenance does contribute to sustainable living, but there’s more to sustainability than just saving energy.

For example, by promptly replacing a missing slate or tile the loss of rafters and ceilings due to damp and rot is prevented. Clearing out or repairing gutters means walls stay dry: wet walls are less thermally efficient than dry ones. Fixing a broken pane of glass keeps heat in and replacing a tap washer will stop water wastage.

SPAB have put together a very simple, 10 point list, 10 easy tips to make a difference, that anyone can take at the beginning of winter to stave off costly major faults and damage at a later date – and when done correctly they will improve energy efficiency too.

You can find the SPAB list here

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